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Warning: This article contains a rant

Warning: This article contains a rant

Marie-Josée Bourque
Marie-Josée Bourque

Have you noticed this? There’s a certain phenomenon that existed before Facebook took over the world, but back then it was limited to coffee breaks and agency office party chit chat. It wasn’t so bad, then. Today, many of us in marketing take great pleasure in eviscerating other peoples’ work with volleys of epithets and emojis. Clearly, group think and the craving to outdo the last comment has many of us using our keyboards as executioners. So the page views multiply. The result? A scary amount of time is devoted to feeding a problem that’s bringing our industry down. It all looks like a lose-lose situation to me.

Sure, I’ve criticized other people’s work before. Sure, there are way too many bad ads. And yes, inexperienced novices think they can be just as good a professional “creative”, that anyone could just do their own ads. Or, better yet, they have a cousin who does that kind of thing in their basement for real cheap.

But what good is it, giving these bad ads all this attention? Our industry is full of brilliant, sensitive, creative – yes, really creative! – people who work in a fascinating, but oh how challenging profession. It seems to me that there are better ways to use our energy than complaining about or even intimidating others on social media. You don’t grow by crushing others. Doing that can actually have the opposite effect.

It’s still that time of year, so I suggest that we make the following resolution – and I’m including myself in this! Dear friends and colleagues, the next time you see what you consider to be a really terrible ad, instead of feeding the problem, why not take the opportunity to put your talent to good use and work on a better solution. The only risk you’ll be taking is that you might get a better return on your time. Our industry will thank you. And, who knows, maybe you’ll attract a new client in the process.

Happy New Year!